What Type of Replacement Window Is Best for My Home?

Making the right decisions about the types of replacement windows to install in your home can seem overwhelming. Knowing which type of window is optimum for each home setting can put you at ease when deciding what is best for your home.

When selecting replacement windows, you’ll typically be faced with making choices about installing 3 types of windows—hung, slider and casement windows. Read on to find out which replacement window is best for each setting in your home.

Hung Windows

Hung windows have a bottom and top section, or “sash.” This type of window slides up and down to open. Hung windows are available in single-hung and double-hung versions. Only the bottom sash of a single-hung window opens. In double-hung windows, both sashes open.

Double-hung windows are the most popular replacement window that Sears Home Services installs.

Builders often install single-hung windows in homes during construction. When homeowners replace single-hung windows, they often install double-hung windows because of the additional versatility they offer. With a double-hung window, you have the option of lowering the top sash, raising the lower sash, or opening both to circulate fresh air. Air can only circulate through the bottom opening of a single-hung window.

Double-hung windows are also much easier to clean than single-hung windows.

When Should You Choose Hung Windows?

Hung windows work best when replacing windows with relatively narrow or standard window openings. Hung windows also provide a classic look for openings at the front of your home. They also work well for openings to walkways, decks and patios.

Hung windows accent the look of traditional styles of homes such as:

  • Ranch
  • Colonial
  • Cottage
  • Craftsman
  • Cape Cod
  • Farmhouse
  • Victorian

You typically won’t install double-hung windows in tall openings where you may have difficulty reaching the top pane.

Pros of Installing Hung Windows

  • Hung windows are easy to open because they use springs to help you lift the window.
  • The vertical tracks of hung windows don’t collect dirt and dust so they open and close smoothly with little maintenance.
  • Hung windows are common and easy to install.
  • Sears Home Services installs hung windows with these additional features:
    • Sloped window sill design to prevent water pooling
    • Low E (low emissivity) glass that reflects heat to keep your home cooler in summer and warmer in winter
    • Double-paned windows filled with Argon glass that reduce heat transfer through the glass
    • Beveled window frames and folding handles for smooth aesthetics
    • Chambered frames for increased strength

Cons of Installing Hung Windows

  • Counterbalance springs can eventually get worn or corroded so the window won’t open and close smoothly
  • The upper pane can be difficult to reach when a hung window is installed in a tall window opening
  • Hung windows seal less tightly than casement windows so air leaks can develop over time

Slider Windows

Slider windows have sashes installed side-by-side and panes slide sideways to open. On single-slider windows, only one sash slides open and the other sash is fixed. Both sashes slide open on double-slider windows.

When Should You Choose Slider Windows?

Slider windows work well on the sides and backs of homes where aesthetics are less important. You’ll typically use slider windows on short, wide window openings where hung and casement window designs don’t work. Choose slider windows in areas where you open windows often.

You’ll often use slider windows to replace existing windows of the same type in contemporary and modern homes. Slider windows are often used in wide but short openings of windows for bathrooms in many homes.

Pros of Installing Slider Windows

  • Slider windows have a simple design. They just slide back and forth on tracks so they need no counterweight springs or crank mechanisms that hung and casement windows use. They are durable because of their simple design.
  • Sliding windows are easy to open and close.
  • Slider windows often cost less than hung and casement windows.
  • Slider windows can cover larger window openings than hung windows and can provide a less restricted view.
  • Additionally, slider windows installed by Sears include these features:
    • Multiple weather seals to prevent air and water leaks
    • Chambered window frames for strength
    • Beveled frames for pleasing aesthetics
    • Low E (low emissivity) glass that reflects heat to keep your home cooler in summer and warmer in winter
    • Double-paned windows filled with Argon glass that reduce heat transfer through the glass

Cons of Installing Slider Windows

  • Dust and dirt accumulates in the horizontal tracks of slider windows so the tracks need periodic cleaning to maintain smooth window opening and closing.
  • Water can collect in the bottom tracks of slider windows and allow mold and mildew to develop if you don’t clean tracks regularly.

Casement Windows

Casement windows use a hinged design that allows you to crank the window open outward on the left or right side of the window frame. Casement windows can open up to 90-degrees outward from the frame.

When Should You Use Casement Windows?

You’ll often use casement windows to cover large picture window openings because they offer an unobstructed view to the outside of your home.

Choose casement windows when you want to provide a clean, modern look for the front of your home.

You can use casement windows in areas where you want to maximize ventilation airflow from the outside of your home.

Pros of Installing Casement Windows

  • Casement windows seal tightly and help prevent drafts when closed.
  • Because of the crank operation for opening, casement windows provide the best security against intruders.
  • Screens are on the inside of casement windows so the outside glass gives your home a bright and shiny look.
  • Casement windows provide the best openings for ventilation and offer an unobstructed view to the outside.
  • As with the other types of windows mentioned above, Sears Home Services installs casement windows with additional advantages such as:
    • Folding crank handles for best security and aesthetics.
    • Cranking mechanism that extends the window a full 90-degrees.
    • Beveled frames for a finished look
    • Chambered frame for added strength
    • Low E (low emissivity) glass that reflects heat to keep your home cooler in summer and warmer in winter
    • Double-paned windows filled with Argon glass that reduce heat transfer through the glass

Cons of Installing Casement Windows

  • You’ll typically need to wash the outer panes of casement windows from the outside of your home.
  • Casement windows protrude outward from your home when opened so they can interfere with patio and walkway space.
  • Strong winds and flying debris can damage casement windows when you leave them open during extreme weather.

Now that you know more about the types of replacement windows to install in your home, it’s time to schedule an appointment with a window expert for a free estimate for your home. Sears Home Services can install the right windows to help keep your home attractive, safe and secure.

Get a free in-home consultation